Contact StemGenex






Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease)

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) describes a group of lung conditions (diseases) that make it difficult to empty the air out of the lungs. This difficulty can lead to shortness of breath (also called breathlessness) or the feeling of being tired. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) can be used to describe a person with chronic bronchitis, emphysema or a combination of these.

The most common cause of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) is cigarette smoking, but there are many other causes. Inhaling smoke or air pollutants can cause the mucus glands that line the bronchial tubes (bronchi) to produce more mucus than normal, and can cause the walls of the bronchi to thicken and swell (inflame). This increase in mucus causes you to cough, frequently resulting in raising mucus (or phlegm). Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) may develop if small amounts of these irritants are inhaled over a long period of time or if large amounts are inhaled over a short period of time.

Environmental factors and genetics may also cause Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease). For example, heavy exposure to certain dusts at work, chemicals and indoor or outdoor air pollution may contribute to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease). The reason why some smokers never develop Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) and why some non-smokers are diagnosed with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) is not fully understood. Family genes or heredity may play a major role in who develops Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease).

The following are facts cited from the American Lung Association (www.lungusa.org) and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (www.cdc.gov).

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) is an umbrella term for progressive lung diseases, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema, that are characterized by obstruction to airflow that interferes with normal breathing. In 2008, 13.1 million U.S. adults (ages 18 and over) were estimated to have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease). However, close to 24 million U.S. adults have evidence of impaired lung function, indicating an under diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease).

In 2008, an estimated 9.8 million Americans reported a physician diagnosis of chronic bronchitis, the inflammation and eventual scarring of the lining of the bronchial tubes. Chronic bronchitis affects people of all ages, although people age 65 and older have the highest rate at 56.3 per 1,000 population.

Females are about twice as likely to be diagnosed with chronic bronchitis as males. In 2008, 3.1 million males had a diagnosis of chronic bronchitis compared with 6.7 million females.

Years of exposure to the irritation of cigarette smoke usually precede the development of emphysema, which irreversibly damages the air sacs of the lungs and results in permanent “holes” in the tissues of the lower lungs. Of the estimated 3.7 million Americans diagnosed with emphysema, 94 percent are 45 or older.

Historically, men have been more likely than women to receive a diagnosis of emphysema. However, in 2008 more women (more than 2 million) reported a diagnosis of emphysema than men (almost 1.8 million).

Smoking is the primary risk factor for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease). Approximately 85 percent to 90 percent of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) deaths are caused by smoking. Female smokers are nearly 13 times as likely to die from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) as women who have never smoked. Male smokers are nearly 12 times as likely to die from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) as men who have never smoked.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) is the third leading cause of death in America, claiming the lives of 137,693 Americans in 2008. That was the ninth consecutive year in which women exceeded men in the number of deaths attributable to COPD. In 2008, more than 71,000 females died compared to nearly 66,000 males.

An American Lung Association survey revealed that half of all Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) patients (51 percent) say their condition limits their ability to work. It also limits them in normal physical exertion (70 percent), household chores (56 percent), social activities (53 percent), sleeping (50 percent), and family activities (46 percent).

In 2010, the cost to the nation for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD or Lung Disease) was estimated to be approximately $49.9 billion, including $29.5 billion in direct health care expenditures, $8.0 billion in indirect morbidity costs, and $12.4 billion in indirect mortality costs.

Contact us for more information about Stem Cell Treatment

To learn more about stem cell treatment simply fill out the form below and a Patient Advocate will contact you shortly.